Posted on: 12/29/2017 by John Siebert
Another year has come and gone, and as usual, SEOs had their work cut out for them. Many issues were top of mind for SEO practitioners in 2017, from concerns about the impact of an unannounced algorithm update to speculation about the impending mobile-first index.  Read More
Posted on: 12/29/2017 by John Siebert
Which mobile app did people download the most in 2017? Which Android app? Which iOS app? Glad you asked. Both Google (which makes Android) and Apple (which makes iOS) have announced the most downloaded mobile apps of 2017. Some are surprises. Others? Not so much.  Read More
Posted on: 12/29/2017 by John Siebert
The Pantone Color Institute has announced the Color of the Year for 2018 — Pantone 18-3838 Ultra Violet. The bold color looks elegant and modern. Color has the ability to convey deep messages and meanings — especially when used by a brand, and for packaging. The Pantone Color Institute, the consulting arm of Pantone (a wholly owned subsidiary of X-Rite, Inc.) forecasts global color trends, advises companies on color in brand identity and product development, and on color assurance programs.  Read More
Posted on: 12/29/2017 by John Siebert
Imagine how future historians might try to summarize 2017: A U.S. president, his family and his political aides came under investigation by a special counsel for possibly helping a foreign government meddle in the election. Talk of impeachment swirled through Congress, where the fracturing Republican Party was in the midst of an identity crisis—and the Democrats were, too. Twitter became a source of official U.S. policy. A wave of sexual harassment allegations took down U.S. senators and congressmen, top judges and reporters, and high-profile political candidates—but not the president, who had been caught on tape admitting to grabbing women “by the pussy.” We learned that the Pentagon has secretly been studying UFOs. All while the leaders of North Korea and the United States exchanged threats to rain down nuclear “fire and fury like the world has never seen.”  Read More
Posted on: 12/21/2017 by John Siebert
From left to right (or for such languages as Arabic or Persian from right to left), from top to bottom that is our accustomed path of exploring things in the books, documents, websites, advertisements, pamphlets, etc. In general, horizontal orientation comes first. So when the things are arranged according to the y-axis, it always feels like a disturbance in the force.  Read More
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